If you had no way of using any digital technologies for one week, how many problems would this cause?

Our survey of 1174 students across our three case study schools sought to explore the extent to which digital technology use was a significant aspect of students’ activities – both in terms of school-related work and in general terms of everyday life. The survey posed the question: “If you had no way of using any digital technologies (including the internet) for one week, how many problems would this cause (on a scale of 1=no problems at all to 10=lots of problems)”.

Students responses were relatively consistent between these two contexts – with a mean response with regards to ‘school work’ of 6.31 (sd=2.56); and a mean response with regards to ‘everyday life’ of 6.54 (sd=2.94).

As can be seen in Table One, some patterning in the significance of digital technology to school work was apparent. In particular, technology was most significant for students attending School B and C (F[2, 1028]=6.20, p<0.005); in grades 11/12 (F[2, 1021]=3.11, p<0.01); female students(t=-3.05, df=1024, p<0.005); and/or those students aspiring to continue onto university-level education(t=-2.31, df=1014, p<0.05).

In terms of ‘everyday life’, significant differences were apparent in terms of students attending School A and B (F[2, 1024]=38.01, p<0.05); female students (t=-4.0, df=1020, p<0.0005) and/or students from households where only English was spoken (t=2.43, df=940, p<0.05).